Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Summer Institute

Innovation + Inclusion Welcome

For our final week of Summer Institute, our guest lecturers were Meenu and Sarina from the University of Maryland. Meenu and Sarina work together at the Academy of Innovation and Entrepreneurship and teach students how to think outside of the box and bring new, interesting ideas to life!

After the “getting to know you” portion of the group, Meenu began to talk to us about the introduction experience. She had mentioned she was at a conference with a lot of new people, and noticed that all she was given, was a simple name tag to introduce herself. Yes, a name tag can be helpful…people will instantly know your name without having to ask. But that’s all they will know about you.

Your name.

Sarina mentioned how a conversation can open up if prompted in the right way. For example: Your doctor asks you how many times a week you go to the gym. You can easily and quickly respond by saying “3-4 times a week”. However, your doctor can get a much better answer with more detail, if he asks you to tell him about your last visit to the gym!  

Meenu then asked the students to pair up, and tell each other a few of their own introduction experiences, mostly the awkward ones! We had a small group of 4 students that day, so pairing was easy. Here are a few of their stories:

[Ben chose to ask Ian a prewritten question: Tell me about a time you had a ‘meeting new people’ horror story.]

Ian: Once I found I had all my strength in my arm. This is scary for both others and me.

Ben: I’ve been there as well my friend. Once I met someone who talked at me like I was a dog, and also got in my face like they wanted to give me a scratch

Ian: So humiliating. So rude. That is so hard for many of us to face time and time again.  

[Tom asked Emma the following question]:

Tom: Tell me about a time someone changed your opinion.

Emma: I think our discussion of autism with Tribe and UVA changed my opinion of NT’s acceptance of us.

Tom: The opinions that I have come from my personal experiences. I believe that there is no excuse for violence in protest. I have never participated in a rally where I have had to face off with haters in person. I saw the events in Charlottesville and I respect the restraint the peaceful protestors showed to not throw punches.

 

After hearing from each other, the group was then told to come up with two different products, services or experience ideas to help their partners have a better introduction experience. Meenu and Sarina also reminded us that with these ideas, the sky’s the limit! Go crazy! Get creative!

Challenge accepted.

Here’s what everyone came up with:

Tom’s ideas for Emma: Noise cancelling headphones that allow people to hear Emma’s true words even when she needs to scream. Technology that soothes Emma’s body like a blanket that Emma can upload  a playlist to. She can share her favorite songs. Music is a great conversation starter.

Emma’s ideas for Tom: First, I would create a window that would allow someone to see who you are inside so they see the real Tom. Then I think would create an empathy hat that lets the wearer feel what it is like to have body brain disconnect.

Ben’s ideas for Ian: The first idea I have for Ian is an automated pair of sunglasses that can sense when someone is attempting to engage Ian in conversation, that can read levels of skepticism as well as trust and comfort and/or fear in an individual. This next idea to help Ian is a little out there- What about a service that coaches people how to handle awkward introductions.

Ian’s ideas for Ben: Have a room for him to lay down in or relax before introducing himself to others. Regulation is key in high stress situations. This is true for neurotypicals too. Send in the techs for my next idea. How about a grand screen to show words as he pokes to letterboard. This is easy to do but helpful.

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Wow! We loved every single idea that these guys came up with, and definitely teared up only a little…

Then, with little time left in the group, Meenu and Sarina administered a quick test to students and communication partners!

We didn’t know much about this quiz, except that it felt like a personality test. All we knew was that we had to answer to the best of our ability. Meenu and Sarina did a quick calculation, and by the end of it, we were told to wear a specific color to Summer Institute the next day. Hmmmm, we wondered…

Tom had to wear yellow. Ben had to wear white. Emma had to wear green. Ian had to wear yellow. Janine had to wear yellow. EV, myself, Liz, and Roxy had to wear green.

We later found out that those colors represented what HATS we wore when thinking creatively in a group!

 

  • Green = Creativity, possibility, new ideas, seeking alternatives/concepts
  • Yellow = Brightness, optimism, values, benefits, feasibility
  • White = Information, facts, what’s known, objective, context

 

 

We all agreed with our hat colors!

 

The next day, we talked about a few different inventions made for several different reasons; The comfortable potato peeler, incubators for newborn babies in Nepal, surgical tools, a bowl that could be held several different ways, the waking up experience. We learned that when people hear the word innovation, they think Eureka! Or the moment when lightning strikes, but innovation is not a one time event. It’s a process to find creative solutions to various problems. The design thinking process is a methodical way to creatively solve problems!

 

Here is an example of the activity:

When babies are born with a low birth weight, they’re kept in an incubator. In Nepal, a team made easier, low maintenance incubators. When the team visited hospitals where incubators were being used, they found that the incubators in the hospitals were totally empty. But tt wasn’t that there weren’t any low weight babies… and the clinics had sufficient electricity. What was the problem?

The team interviewed the parents and learned that babies were usually born at home, NOT at clinics. The need wasn’t for cheaper, easier incubators, but the need was to keep babies warm. They also had insight that most mothers in labor didn’t have the means to make it to the clinic. So, the team created blue sleeping bags that were easy to clean and kept their babies warm ( we also learned that white in their culture is associated with death!). EMBRACE is now it’s own company! What does this tell you about the process?

 

Emma:  Had to create the right solution for the right problem

Ian: Seeing the direct problem and understanding the culture

DDK: I think there is an element of compassion to solve a completely new problem.

Tom: The process involves being educated about the community it’s supposed to serve.

Ben: Sensing the problem.

Nailed it!

The last day of Summer Institute, the group went to the University of Maryland to put all of our great ideas to the test! We all broke out into small groups, 1-2 students and a communication partner, to create a prototype for the inventions they created earlier in the week. We shared out the ideas afterward, and discussed how to give feedback using the phrase “I like…I wish…I wonder”.

For example, “I like the colors you used in your painting. I wish to see more of your personality in it. I wonder if people will understand what you are trying to say.”

 

This has been especially important to this group – learning how to give feedback!

 

Take a look at the pictures of our adventure at UMD and the Academy for Innovation and Entrepreneurship below!

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Tom hanging out in the “workshop”!

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Ben and Janine creating the prototype for his sunglasses.

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Ian and Roxy creating the prototype for his “grand screen” letterboard.

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Emma and Meghann creating the prototype for the “Empathy Hat”.

What an incredible experience for all who took part and an amazing way to wrap up our Summer Institute!

Until next time,

~Meghann and The Tribe

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Letterboards, not just life changing.. life saving

I am so excited to introduce Diane Belnavis and Brent Sullivan as guest bloggers!  We formed an instant friendship when I met Brent, Diane and Dylan at the TASH Conference in Portland Oregon in November 2015. They have one of the most beautiful stories I have ever heard and it keeps getting better and better with time.  I am so grateful to Brent and Diane for their willingness to share their story.  Be sure to meet Brent at the Nonspeaking CommUnity Consortium’s Motormorphosis Conference July 21-23, 2017!

Diane’s story:
In the spring of 1984, six years before my son Dylan was born, Brent joined our family. He is a non-speaker with autism and is now 48 years old.

Dylan (left) and Brent (right)

While in graduate school in Oregon in the early 80’s, I worked as the night manager of a group home for children with disabilities (yes, children. really). Brent moved into the home with four other children in 1982. He was thirteen years old. When I finished my degree a few years later and left my job at the group home, Brent came with me. By that time, we were close friends and I knew that there was no way I could leave him behind.

My son Dylan was born six years later. They grew up as brothers and have always been close, even though there is a 20 year age difference. When Dylan was in elementary school, he wrote an amazing story titled ‘My very own Rain Man’. It is the story of his childhood with Brent. They have created their own holiday family traditions together, and Brent has been there with Dylan through every one of life’s milestones.

Dylan was living in Portland, Oregon when Brent began using the letterboard three years ago. Of course I kept him up to date on the progress Brent was making, but until he saw Brent do it for himself, the reality of Spelling to Communicate didn’t really sink in. He met Elizabeth and the GKTC tribe in 2015 when they presented in Portland at the TASH conference, and months later decided to move back to Pennsylvania to learn letterboard with Brent.

Brent and Dylan – brothers in every meaning of the word.

Dylan became Brent’s official staff person last year and they now work on letterboard a few times a week (in between farm chores and planting sunflowers!). Last fall, Brent spelled to Dylan ‘Stop I am in need of medical attention’. Since then, for the last six months, Brent has been guiding us with spelling… through medical appointments, surgery, ultrasounds, cat scans, blood work and XRays. We have practiced scenarios, watched YouTube videos to prepare, and Brent has instructed us, by letterboard, what to say to the doctor in order to lessen his anxiety and keep his body calm through exams. I go into each test and appointment first, and explain to the doctor or technician the requests Brent has made and the trigger words to avoid.

Dylan was dedicated to learning to use the letterboards with Brent.

He has been unbelievable. He has been completely successful in completing everything asked of him. He has guided Dylan and me through each day as far as how he wishes to change his diet and his daily routine to improve his overall health. He has spelled ‘Do not offer me any sugar’, ‘Take me to the Y for exercise’, and even ‘No, I don’t want ice cream, I want a fruit smoothie for dessert’!

In March, he spelled to Elizabeth ‘Letterboard has saved my life’.

“THE SAD REALITY IS THAT MANY HAVE GIVEN UP ON ADULTS. OUR LIVES MATTER.”

Brent’s story:
MY DESIRE IS TO ADVOCATE FOR COMMUNICATION SUPPORTS AND HOUSING FOR ADULT AUTISTICS. LIFE IS WORTH LIVING NOW THAT I HAVE COMMUNICATION. ELIZABETH, COMMUNICATION JUST SAVED MY LIFE. I FEEL GRATEFUL BECAUSE I TOLD MY DOCTORS WHAT WAS HAPPENING. I AM WORRIED BUT BELIEVE IN THE DOCTORS AND MEDICAL INTERVENTION.

ELIZABETH, I AM THE MOST LUCKY MAN EVER. BUT THE ONES IN SILENCE ARE NOT SO LUCKY. THEY MIGHT NOT EVER BE ABLE TO TELL SOMEONE THEY ARE SICK. THEY MAY NEVER SAY I LOVE YOU. THEY NEED TO LEARN HOW TO SPELL ON THE STENCIL BOARDS AND LETTERBOARD TOO. TEACH THEM LIKE YOU TAUGHT ME.

ELIZABETH, I WAS THINKING ABOUT MY LIFE. I NEED TO MAKE SOMETHING OF MY TIME ON EARTH. THE WORST THING IS TO BE A VISITOR TO LIFE INSTEAD OF A PARTICIPANT. I WANT TO ADVOCATE FOR OTHER INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE TRAPPED IN THEIR OWN BODIES. THEY MUST FEEL THE SAME LONELINESS I DID. TIME TO JOIN THE CONVERSATION INSTEAD OF BEING THE CONVERSATION.

THE SAD REALITY IS THAT MANY HAVE GIVEN UP ON ADULTS. OUR LIVES MATTER. ELIZABETH, THIS IS MY MISSION NOW. THE ADULTS HAVE GONE SILENT TOO LONG. MY QUALITY OF LIFE HAS CHANGED DRAMATICALLY SINCE I STARTED SPELLING WITH DIANE AND ELIZABETH AND DYLAN.

ELIZABETH, NOT WITHOUT SPELLING WOULD I HAVE BEEN ABLE TO GET THE MEDICAL HELP I NEEDED. JUST HOW MANY HAVE DIED OR SUFFERED JUST BECAUSE THEIR OWN BROKEN BODIES CONDEMN THEM TO SILENCE?

ELIZABETH, THERE IS MUCH WE NEED TO DO. LET’S REACH OUT TO SILENT ADULTS AND TEACH THEM TO SPELL ON THE LETTERBOARDS. TEACH PARENTS, CAREGIVERS AND THOSE WHO WORK WITH MENTAL EDUCATION THAT ONE IS NEVER TOO OLD TO LEARN.

 

Elizabeth and Brent hamming it up!

Thank you to Brent and Diane for sharing their beautiful story, dreams and hopes with us. I am truly grateful to have you all in my life!  ~Elizabeth

We have a dream… celebrating MLK weekend in Atlanta

In celebration of Martin Luther King Day, we are reposting this blog from MLK weekend in Atlanta 2 years ago!  Wow!  It is amazing to see how far along these fantastic spellers and self advocates have come since then! The fight for communication rights is stronger than ever! ~Elizabeth

I returned from my second workshop in Atlanta on Martin Luther King Day, January 19, 2015. What a great workshop – 9 funny, smart, hard-working and thoughtful kids, great parents eager to use…

Source: We have a dream… celebrating MLK weekend in Atlanta