Puppy Love

When people meet Buddy, our OT dog, they often ask me how I became interested in animal assisted occupational therapy.  While this picture says 1,000 words, I will still write a few more!

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Well, the journey began when I was born.  No, really!  My family adopted a golden retriever puppy a few months before I was born and I grew up with him.  His name was Jake, as most golden retrievers were named at the time, and he always wanted to be close to me.  I read to him, shared my music, and styled his “hair” on a regular basis.  He was fun and gentle, and the #1 reason why my family and I became such big dog lovers.

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Karen and Jake.

When I was 12-years-old, my mom started raising puppies for Guiding Eyes for the Blind.  It was hard for all of us to love and help raise a puppy, only to say goodbye after 16 months.  We kept raising though, because we saw what a tremendous impact these dogs have on the life of a blind person.  When I was a senior in high school, I decided I wanted to be the primary raiser of a puppy.  Her name was Julie and I took her to training, I took her out in the community so she could be comfortable in any setting, and I watched her grow from an 8-week-old puppy to a certified Guide Dog.  It was hard to say goodbye, but I couldn’t be prouder of the work that she has done.

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Karen and Julie, a puppy she raised for Guiding Eyes for the Blind.

When I went to college I realized that I needed a dog for myself.  I brought my family dog, Ink, with me when my sophomore year started and he made a tremendous difference in my overall well-being.  He was my “doggie soulmate” and followed me to graduate school.  I can honestly say that Ink deserves every bit as much credit for my diplomas as I do.  He was a constant ray of sunshine and encouraged me to exercise more, laugh more, and take time to play around.

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Photos by Shelley Castle Photography.

Needless to say, from the moment I decided to be an occupational therapist, I knew I wanted to have a dog to help my clients.  There has been an explosion in the types of jobs dogs are now doing.  Just to name a few, dogs lead the blind, sniff out bombs and bed bugs, alert people with diabetes and seizures, and detect cancer.  They are being used more and more to reduce stress and anxiety.  Because dogs are very attuned to humans after living with us for thousands of years, they are especially suited for therapy work.

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Karen with Prince, a service dog her family raised for Veteran’s Moving Forward.

My goal is for Buddy to aid in regulation and provide a new, fun way to practice purposeful movements.  My mom is Buddy’s primary trainer.  It takes a long time to train a service dog and a long time for a puppy to mature enough to be a working dog.  They also have to want to be a working dog.  We are having Buddy visit the office for socialization and becoming familiar with the environment.  He is interacting with clients on a very limited basis so we can gain some insight into what tasks he could be trained to do and how they might need to be modified for our clients.  For example, it is much easier for a student to give Buddy a treat in a bowl rather than directly by hand.

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GKTC staff and interns working with Buddy.

He is only eight months old, but I am very excited by the potential I see in “the Bud.” Some of the tasks I foresee Buddy doing with students are:

  • retrieving a ball that’s been thrown
  • responding to commands given with only hand signals
  • coming to the sound of a clicker
  • copying a client as he or she sits, lies down, crawls, or rolls (Doggie Yoga anyone??)
  • solving a food puzzle the client has loaded
  • finding things a client has hidden
  • navigating an obstacle course with a client doing various tasks at stations

I am excited my Therapy Dog Thursday Facebook posts are being enjoyed by so many people.  It is a nice way for people to watch Buddy grow up and see what he is doing for training (follow #BuddyTheOTDog).  I will be writing a series of Buddy lessons that describe his journey, challenges, and what he learns as he grows up. One of Buddy’s current challenges is to stay calm wherever he goes.  He loves people and is highly motivated to work with them, but he needs to calmly approach a new friend and not give them as many kisses!

Growing Kids clients are our best autism experts.  So, I want to ask the experts, “What would you like to be able to do with Buddy?  What would you like to learn about Buddy?”  Please let me know in the comments here or in the comments on Facebook!

 

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Buddy at 4-months-old.

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Karen and Buddy snuggling after a long day.

Until next time!
~Karen

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Chess Friends Forever

Hi everyone!  My name is Karen Dorula and I’m an occupational therapist at GKTC.  Elizabeth has challenged us all to jump onto the blog.  I’m very excited to be able to share all of the wonderful chess that has been happening here!

I started teaching chess in January 2016 after one of my letterboard clients, William, asked me to teach him “something hard.”  I thought of many different challenging topics, such as the periodic table of elements or the physics of outer space, but when I thought of chess, a quote from one of my favorite movies popped into my head: “Knight to e4.”  (Yes, it’s a Harry Potter quote!)

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I went online and immediately started learning everything there was to know about something called “Algebraic Chess Notation” (ACN).  ACN is a system of letters and numbers that correspond to moves on a chessboard.  Most players use ACN to record their moves in a game so they can review it later.  I thought it would be a perfect way for William to communicate the move he wanted to make and since I’m an occupational therapist, I saw this as a great opportunity for him to practice his motor skills as well.  

ACN Board

There was one slight problem.  I didn’t really know how to play chess.  I had a basic understanding of how the pieces move, but that was it.  I reviewed the fundamentals of chess by myself, and then started teaching it to William.  We practiced simply moving the pieces to a targeted location.  He would spell out the ACN on a letterboard and then I provided him with the least amount of assistance to move the piece.  I continued to teach him more advanced concepts by staying only one step ahead at any given moment.  This became a problem as I realized just how quickly he was learning.  Something that would take me an hour to learn took him only a few minutes.  For example, when capturing, you spell out the symbol for the piece you want to move, the file it’s currently on, an x to indicate the capture, and the square you want it to move to.  So, if you want to capture a piece using your rook, it might look something like, Raxg5.  This took me a longer to learn than I care to admit, but after a few minutes of practice, William spelled, “MAKES SENSE TO ME.”  

William loved learning chess so I dove in head first.  I spent hours a day playing chess on my phone and watching videos online that I later turned into lessons.  After a few weeks, he sat down to play a game with his dad.  His parents noted how regulated he was during the game.  His body was able to stay extremely calm because his brain was so engaged.  As I teach more people to play, regulation is a common result of chess.

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William’s first time playing against his dad.
(From left to right: William, George, Karen)

I have now taught dozens of students how to play.  At first, I didn’t realize just how perfect chess can be for people who spell to communicate (thank you to Elizabeth for seeing the potential!).  Chess is a hobby that can be played throughout a lifetime and you can always learn something new.  Since there are small “mini games” you can play, you can practice even if you only have 10 minutes.  It’s a fun way to get on the letterboards with family members and practice skills.

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Huan and Ian playing a Knight Game, with Huan’s brother and Ian’s dad holding the letterboards.
(From left to right: Thuy, Huan, Ian, Eric)

Chess is also the best equalizer.  It doesn’t matter your age, gender, race, language, socioeconomic status, or diagnosis.  During a discussion about chess as an equalizer, Dustin wrote: “THAT WAS WHY I WANTED TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY WITH THE LETTERBOARD.  PLAYING WITH THE LETTERBOARD IS A WAY TO PLAY WITH YOUR MIND INSTEAD OF YOUR BODY.”

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Chess provides the perfect opportunity to meet new friends.  Here’s a conversation from a chess sessions with Ethan and Dominic:

E: HI, MY NAME IS ETHAN.  KAREN HAS TOLD ME SO MUCH ABOUT YOU.  MAY GO PROFESSIONAL WITH CHESS.  KIDDING.

D: THAT WAS FUNNY.  MY NAME IS DOMINIC.  I JUST STARTED PLAYING THIS WEEK.  I AM REALLY EXCITED TO PLAY.

E: THANK YOU.  MAKES ME HAPPY TO MAKE A NEW FRIEND.

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William, Ethan, and Dominic play against each other in pairs or have “Chess Club,” which they have named One For All, so they can learn and practice drills together.  
(From left to right: Rabun, William, Ethan, Karen, Dominic)

 

I’m grateful to William for challenging me to learn something hard.  Chess didn’t turn out to be very hard for him, but it has become a hobby that he loves.  Chess combines motor, communication, and friendship, which is an OTs dream.  My absolute favorite part of chess is the CFF – Chess Friends Forever – that have been formed! These friendships are what push me to stay up to speed with my students and continue to improve with every session.

I will become more active on the blogs to share information and other activities that we’ve been doing at GKTC.  Until next time!

~Karen