GKTC Tribe and UVA: Creating Welcoming Communities, a kickoff exchange!

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GKTC’s Tribe has kicked off the fall schedule with an exchange between The University of Virginia students and Tribe members. The University of Virginia students are taking the undergrad psychology course, The Science and Lived Experience of Autism along with the young adults of Growing Kids Therapy Center’s “Tribe”.  Last year, the Tribe completed the coursework for this class along with the UVA students.  This year, the Tribe will be collaborators working with the UVA students to deepen their understanding of autism, inclusion, and neurodiversity.  The Tribe and UVA students interact and collaborate through shared blogs, discussion and project groups and several in-person exchanges. The objective of our first exchange on Saturday, September 16, was to begin discussing ideas of what makes a welcoming community and the kinds of ways that we can contribute to making our community and other communities more welcoming.  

GKTC staff present: Elizabeth Vosseller, Meghann Parkinson, Janine Caguicla, Roxy Cuadra.  UVa staff present: Dr. Vikram Jaswal, Allison 

Group A: Tribe participants in Room A (EV): Ryan, Dustin, T
Group B: Tribe participants in Room B (Janine, Roxy): Ben, Tom
Group C: Tribe participants in Room C (Meghann, Vikram): Huan, Lisa

UVa students rotated in different rooms across two rotations; participated in the large group discussion; and then in the small group project discussions. Take a look at some of our discussions:

Group A kicked off their time together by discussing the intricacies of introductions. Take a look at what they said! 

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Introduction and a secret:

Claire: I have played piano for 10 years

Katie: One of my jobs was to be the Yogi bear mascot

Dustin: My name is Dustin I have unique sense of humor

Haley: I work training giant African rats to sniff out bombs for the DOD

Annie: When I was 10, I worked in a singing ice cream shop. The employees would sing

Ryan: I’m Ryan. I have an obsession with music.

Morgan: I have torn my ACL twice. The second time I tore it, I fell down the stairs.

T: You guys are cool. I’m Tristan. Definitely, my secret is that I’m a science nerd.

Bobby: Unlike most people when they get stressed who nap or relax, I build things. I built a robot and a 3D printer.

Elizabeth: I am director of Growing Kids Therapy Center. I have a deathly fear of Frogs

Sam: I’m from Herndon

Let’s build a better introduction: What questions could we ask each other?

Sam: What is your experience of home?

Morgan: Recruitment chair for sorority — open-ended questions about family, friends, what you want to do in the future and what do you do for fun. Not quantitative, but “How do you interact with your siblings?” Instead of “How many siblings do you have”

Elizabeth: As a speech pathologist, we want a language sample so we ask open-ended questions.

Dustin: I would like to know what someone is passionate about.

Katie: I think that is a great way to get to know someone and their personality

Annie: I was gonna say “what are you passionate about too” Asking to find similarities to find common ground

Elizabeth: How do you ask that in a question?

Annie: Bring up something you are passionate about, and then ask for someone else’s thoughts

Elizabeth: Even if someone says they hate music, that is an interesting conversation-starter

T: Making differences less noticeable by finding common ground like Annie said.

Ryan: I like to know what kind of music someone likes.

If you were going to invent something and money’s no object, what would you create to make the introduction easier

Bobby(UVa): Hitchhikers guide to the galaxy — device which allows you to hear what people want to say vs what they actually say.

Dustin: I echo what Bobby said

Annie(UVa): Invent something that would take the awkwardness out of the situation. Like an “awkward dehumidifier”

Ryan: Such a great idea.

T: Something that reveals truth not everyone’s eyewash

Group B kicked off their time together by discussing a video and what it takes to create a welcoming community.  Take a look at what they said! 

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If we don’t have means to communicate and join the discussion, a lot of conversation happens about and around you. Why was Shelbyville assigned for today’s discussion about creating welcoming communities? What did you get from the film?

Brittany – showed stereotypes, example of unwelcoming community

Natalie – refusing to accept culture, reluctant to change because not something they were used to

Ben – keeping a closed mind about others. To me this is too familiar, most see us in a segregated manner.

Tom – there were some members of the community who tried to be more accommodating

The language of “us” and “them”. Us – the Shelbyville community, even those that a diverse community. Them – the immigrants. Tom brought up that some members were trying to be accommodating – what are some examples?

Natalie – the one church, although their overall goal was to convert, wanted to host dinners

Motivation was questionable. Woman was trying to teach them to pass citizen test.

Tom – there are examples of community members who are from a different country, (who) remember the transition (to Shelbyville), there was a guy who worked in general motors.

Ben – life is funny in that there is always going to be two sides to every story. In the story the church included, but not in the fashion needed by those ostracized by the masses.

The church was trying to include but with questionable intentions. In hosting dinners, what were they doing that was supposed to be welcoming but may have been not so welcoming?

Natalie – when one of the women at the dinner where they cooked and tried to show their culture, asked if they were going to bomb the town based on rumors she had heard. Even though sampling their culture is a step in the right direction, being asked that about a refugee trying to escape a situation was pretty awful.

Ben – while things were supposed to be getting to know each other, the questions were one-sided. The Shelbyville people asked all the questions.

Tom – The religious leaders who met were all white men.

Natalie – thought it was interesting the only time I got a sense of someone acknowledging their privilege in Shelbyville was when four heads of different churches were talking – what can we do because this is threatening our way of life – but one said well it’s easy for us to say because it’s coming from us/we’re privileged. The other time when someone said I have people approaching me saying how am I supposed to get rid of this attitude that have been ingrained in me my whole life.

Roxy – what do you think a person could do, after you recognize that privilege, how do you shift that thought? What step would come next out of that realization?

Lily – finding things you have in common, how you’re more similar than different

Hunter – recognizing places in your behavior which may have been influenced by whatever privilege you might have and then making a conscious effort to change

Natalie – leading from example

Ben – Attention community: you can be part of the civil right movement by noticing and speaking to minority groups.

Tom – Dialogue is key, but also dive into the communities.

Group C had a similar discussion as Group B: 

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Vikram: so, the meat of our conversation in this breakout group is focused on the Shelbyville documentary and reading about Charlottesville. I have some guiding questions but i would love for this conversation to grow organically. Any thoughts about why this documentary was chosen?

Raquel: I thought the Shelbyville documentary had a lot of examples of the more effective ways of how to make a welcoming community. Some groups did reach out and others did not

Carolynn: I thought it was really interesting how when they brought the reporter in, he was saying he wrote the [negative] articles and had been trying to report the truth and wanted to talk to the Somalis – interesting excuse he provided

Izzy: they always referred to the people as their racial group, not just as the person. Salon worker said ‘When the hispanics come in to get their haircut’ – trying to sound not like she’s looking at their race, but by saying that, she is. This correlates to people with autism – referring to people within their group, and not as people.

Huan: I think ignorance is poison to society and no matter what, it’s not going to be solved without honest difficult discussion.

Vikram: what kind of things have to be discussed?

Huan: Oh Vikram. Where to start? Maybe we start with stereotypes.

Lisa: I think having a straight discussion can only educate those willing to listen

Vikram: so what do we do about people who aren’t willing to listen? How do we change?

Lisa: we share mindsets. We try to understand them too.

Xara: Going back to what Izzy said, people assume by not interfering (they are creating welcoming community), but they’re actually being apathetic.

Meghann: there’s a man who goes out who meets members of the KKK and white supremacists, to try to understand them.

Vikram: one of the things that I heard from a philosopher when communities get together to discuss the hard stuff, he says we should start by talking about soccer and movies before moving to the hard stuff.

Flo: there were protesters on both ends (in Cville), but by being there you’re not being productive – the Vice documentary interviewing the white supremacists would’ve been interesting to be a part of from the other side

Meghann: just showing up is like buying a brand name, you want people to know you’re there and you’re not doing anything

Vikram: what should happen – how do you grapple to try and solve this problem given the history of marginalized groups?

Xara: on tuesday, there were some student protesters [who shrouded] the TJ statue with a #BLM banner. An email was sent that gave a narrative and counter-protest statement from the students that said this was a wider thing than just a student CIO voice. Where is the line – if you remove the Jefferson statue does it end there? Where do you draw that line in terms of change and what is productive/progressive?

Huan: I think the statues would be better suited for museums for educational purposes because let’s face it, history cannot be changed

Xara: what do you think about university statutes? Would the rotunda count as a museum?

Huan: well it’s tough to say, but how important is the statue?

Lisa: I think it’s incredibly old fashioned to honor historical figures with statues. They’re not Gods. they’re taught in schools so their memory’s honored.
After the discussions, all the students enjoyed eating lunch together outside! 

 

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We had a wonderful, inclusive experience! Until next time, Roxy and the Tribe!

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Chess Friends Forever

Hi everyone!  My name is Karen Dorula and I’m an occupational therapist at GKTC.  Elizabeth has challenged us all to jump onto the blog.  I’m very excited to be able to share all of the wonderful chess that has been happening here!

I started teaching chess in January 2016 after one of my letterboard clients, William, asked me to teach him “something hard.”  I thought of many different challenging topics, such as the periodic table of elements or the physics of outer space, but when I thought of chess, a quote from one of my favorite movies popped into my head: “Knight to e4.”  (Yes, it’s a Harry Potter quote!)

Harry Potter Ron

I went online and immediately started learning everything there was to know about something called “Algebraic Chess Notation” (ACN).  ACN is a system of letters and numbers that correspond to moves on a chessboard.  Most players use ACN to record their moves in a game so they can review it later.  I thought it would be a perfect way for William to communicate the move he wanted to make and since I’m an occupational therapist, I saw this as a great opportunity for him to practice his motor skills as well.  

ACN Board

There was one slight problem.  I didn’t really know how to play chess.  I had a basic understanding of how the pieces move, but that was it.  I reviewed the fundamentals of chess by myself, and then started teaching it to William.  We practiced simply moving the pieces to a targeted location.  He would spell out the ACN on a letterboard and then I provided him with the least amount of assistance to move the piece.  I continued to teach him more advanced concepts by staying only one step ahead at any given moment.  This became a problem as I realized just how quickly he was learning.  Something that would take me an hour to learn took him only a few minutes.  For example, when capturing, you spell out the symbol for the piece you want to move, the file it’s currently on, an x to indicate the capture, and the square you want it to move to.  So, if you want to capture a piece using your rook, it might look something like, Raxg5.  This took me a longer to learn than I care to admit, but after a few minutes of practice, William spelled, “MAKES SENSE TO ME.”  

William loved learning chess so I dove in head first.  I spent hours a day playing chess on my phone and watching videos online that I later turned into lessons.  After a few weeks, he sat down to play a game with his dad.  His parents noted how regulated he was during the game.  His body was able to stay extremely calm because his brain was so engaged.  As I teach more people to play, regulation is a common result of chess.

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William’s first time playing against his dad.
(From left to right: William, George, Karen)

I have now taught dozens of students how to play.  At first, I didn’t realize just how perfect chess can be for people who spell to communicate (thank you to Elizabeth for seeing the potential!).  Chess is a hobby that can be played throughout a lifetime and you can always learn something new.  Since there are small “mini games” you can play, you can practice even if you only have 10 minutes.  It’s a fun way to get on the letterboards with family members and practice skills.

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Huan and Ian playing a Knight Game, with Huan’s brother and Ian’s dad holding the letterboards.
(From left to right: Thuy, Huan, Ian, Eric)

Chess is also the best equalizer.  It doesn’t matter your age, gender, race, language, socioeconomic status, or diagnosis.  During a discussion about chess as an equalizer, Dustin wrote: “THAT WAS WHY I WANTED TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY WITH THE LETTERBOARD.  PLAYING WITH THE LETTERBOARD IS A WAY TO PLAY WITH YOUR MIND INSTEAD OF YOUR BODY.”

Dustin chess PNG.jpgDustin playing against a friend.

Chess provides the perfect opportunity to meet new friends.  Here’s a conversation from a chess sessions with Ethan and Dominic:

E: HI, MY NAME IS ETHAN.  KAREN HAS TOLD ME SO MUCH ABOUT YOU.  MAY GO PROFESSIONAL WITH CHESS.  KIDDING.

D: THAT WAS FUNNY.  MY NAME IS DOMINIC.  I JUST STARTED PLAYING THIS WEEK.  I AM REALLY EXCITED TO PLAY.

E: THANK YOU.  MAKES ME HAPPY TO MAKE A NEW FRIEND.

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William, Ethan, and Dominic play against each other in pairs or have “Chess Club,” which they have named One For All, so they can learn and practice drills together.  
(From left to right: Rabun, William, Ethan, Karen, Dominic)

 

I’m grateful to William for challenging me to learn something hard.  Chess didn’t turn out to be very hard for him, but it has become a hobby that he loves.  Chess combines motor, communication, and friendship, which is an OTs dream.  My absolute favorite part of chess is the CFF – Chess Friends Forever – that have been formed! These friendships are what push me to stay up to speed with my students and continue to improve with every session.

I will become more active on the blogs to share information and other activities that we’ve been doing at GKTC.  Until next time!

~Karen

 

 

The ABC’s of Inclusion

Last month we were delighted to participate in the Institute of Communication and Inclusion held in Columbia, Maryland. We presented to a great audience of people who are dedicated to serving nonspeaking and minimally speaking individuals. We got to collaborate with so many progressive thinkers and meet some of our inclusion super heroes, Cheryl Jorgeson and Paula Kluth! Our own Meghann Parkinson and skilled Atlanta practitioner, Kelsey Aughey joined me as we held daily skill building workshops for 20 plus spellers and their communication partners to help practice new skills. Since the focus of the conference was on inclusion, we decided to put our groups of subject matter experts to work!

Practicing independent typing with Philip!

Practicing independent typing with Philip!

One of our groups focused on typing skills. This group was challenged to come up with the ABC’s of inclusion!  Each student, Philip, Mike, Camille and Matthew took turns writing a sentence for each letter with the keyboard held for them.  After typing their sentence, each practiced typing one or more of the words independently. All made fantastic progress!  Our friend, Philip Reyes, reported that this was one of his favorite parts of the conference and wrote about his experience in his blog, Faith, Hope, Love and Autism.  

Actual inclusion opens doors.
Be patient with us.
Caring people make it successful.
Don’t give up.
Excellent expectations.
Friends, need I say more?
Give us lots of patient encouragement.
Hear us when we spell.
In day, talking to friends opens my world.
Just like typically functioning,need support.
Keep believing in us.
Learn challenging subjects.
Must be proud.
No baby talk.
Open hearts please us.
Praise our achievements as they are yours as well.
Question your assumptions.
Remember we are just like you.
Spelling is our way out.
Treat us with respect.
Understand totally intelligent and eager to learn.
Voices must be heard.
Wait for us to finish our thoughts.
Xylophone can’t make open words and it still is in the orchestra.
You are needed for our success.

Zero tolerance for non believers.

One of our other groups was tasked with giving advising educators on inclusive practice. Not only did the come up with some great tips, they also collaborated on an acrostic poem!

Huan: INCLUSION IS LIKE ACCESSING ALL FACILITIES AVAILABLE TO EVERYONE. THERE IS A NEED FOR SPACE WHERE EVERYONE FEELS PROTECTED. CAN I SHARE MY SPACE WITH EVERYONE? YES. LEARNING TO SHARE MEANS KEEPING TALKERS ENGAGED IN MY TYPING.

Nadia: BE ALL CARING, DO NOT YELL

Harry:  BE OPEN TO RECREATE INDIVIDUAL EXPERIENCES…SOME NEED CERTAIN ACCOMMODATION.

I think everyone should be included.
No one should miss each opportunity.
Children all deserve a good start.
Learn to share with all others.
Understand strengths.
See the intelligence underneath.
Instead of treating me like not smart, treat me like smart.
Obstacles may come, they make us stronger.

No child left behind!

Finally, we finished our third day of skill practice by creating a Pokemon Go inspired game to take our skills out in the community in our own game of Communication Go! The object was to “capture” (by snapping a picture) an introduction, a conversation, sensory aids, a story ~ any form of communication or comfort! The more you communicate, the more “experience points” you gain!  We all had a blast meeting folks all over the conference center and loved sharing our finds!
Lucas and his mom capture a sensory soft t-shirt AND an introduction! Bonus Points!

Lucas and his mom capture a sensory soft t-shirt AND an introduction! Bonus Points!

Once again, we find our students are our very best educators! So inspired by their messages of inclusion and we can’t wait to put them into practice. Feel free to share their great tips for inclusion – just in time for back to school!
~Elizabeth, Meghann, Kelsey and our friends at the ICI