Open letter to ASHA from Emma Budway & Benjamin McGann

Emma: My name is Emma Budway,

Ben: and I am Benjamin McGann and we both use spelling to communicate.

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Ben & Emma at the ASAN 2016 Gala. where they received the award for Self Advocates of the Year 

Emma: The majority of my and Benjamin’s childhood was spent in countless therapies and special education.

Ben: Each claiming to get through to the autistic child and teach him or her to be normal, or at least their version of normal.

Emma: The problem with that is we are not their version of normal. We do not move, communicate, or learn in conventional or traditional ways. Yet, we are tested and measured in conventional and traditional ways.

Ben: Those tests show results that do not accurately reflect our true intellect or ability to take in and comprehend information. They do reflect, however, the disconnect between brain and body.

Emma: That is where spelling to communicate benefits nonspeaking autistics. It’s not someone simply picking up a letter board and words magically come out,

Ben: It involves rigorous training for the communication partner, and weeks to months and sometimes even years of practice and dedication for the autistic and their family to be able to get to open communication.

Emma: Now that we can, we can tell our families we love them.

Ben: We can tell doctors what hurts.

Emma: We can teach the Neurotypical world about the Neurodiverse.

Ben: If that is taken away, a generation of bright minds will be silenced once again.

Ben

Ben & Emma have been friends since preschool, now they have a way to communicate with each other.

Sincerely,

Benjamin McGann and Emma Budway

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DEEJ The Movie: Inclusion shouldn’t be a lottery

What a spectacular night at the Atlas Theater in Washington DC for the screening of Deej! Deej is the must-see documentary about DJ Savarese, a nonspeaking autistic and his journey to be included as a college student. The film is powerful and a story that we hope will become common for all of our students. GKTC’s Benjamin McGann participated in a post-screening panel.  Benjamin is a nonspeaking self-advocate and a board member of The Nonspeaking CommUnity Consortium.  Benjamin discussed his thoughts on the film with: Julia Bascom, Executive Director of ASAN; Erica Ginsberg, Executive Director of Docs in Progress; Jenn Lynn, Executive Director of Upcounty Resources; Elizabeth Vosseller, Director of Growing Kids Therapy Center; and Robert Rooy, the director of Deej. Benjamin brought his usual wisdom, insight, and eloquence to the discussion.

The Atlas Theater, Washington DC

Benjamin McGann shares his thoughts about Deej having editorial control in this documentary.

When asked what Ben thought about the film he responded,  LOTS TO ABSORB. I LOVED IT ALL THOUGH.
Ben introduced himself. HI, I’M AUTISTIC. I AM REALLY REALLY HAPPY TO COME TOGETHER TONIGHT.

The panel discussed the film and the fact that Deej was such an intrinsic part of the film and its production.  Ben added,  MY THOUGHTS ARE RACING. THIS IS THE STORY WE NEED TO TELL OTHERS AND SHARE. THANK YOU, ROB, FOR TELLING THIS STORY SO RESPECTFULLY.

“…I CAN THINK AND LEARN AND LOVE AND WORK”

Julia Bascom talked about autism and disability in adulthood and the support needed for adults with disabilities to be successful.  In response to Julia’s points, Ben elaborated, THANK YOU. I USUALLY INTERNALIZE THESE KINDS OF FEELING.  IT IS REFRESHING TO HEAR THIS KIND OF DISCUSSION. I AM AN ADULT, HOWEVER, MANY VIEW ME AS A CHILD BECAUSE I CANNOT SPEAK. BUT I CAN THINK AND LEARN AND LOVE AND WORK.

An audience member asked, “Ben, what gives you hope about the future?”
B: I HAVE HOPE COMING HERE TONIGHT AND SEEING THIS FILM AND HAVING THIS DISCUSSION WITH ALL OF YOU.

 Deej screenings are being held all over the United States and Canada, often with panel discussions following the film. Be sure to check the Deej Facebook page for a screening near you.
~Elizabeth and Benjamin