Art as Social Protest: Let Us Show You The Wei!

GKTC Summer Institute kicked off the summer exploring multimedia journalism: photography, videography, television, and radio. The past two weeks in Summer Institute was all about media in a different context… A R T!

Liz Michaels, GKTC’s longterm intern, is also an art instructor and led us in a discussion about types of art: fine art and conceptual art. We learned that in fine art, more value is placed on the aesthetic aspect of the final work while in conceptual art, the thoughtful idea or concept behind the work takes precedence. One particular type of conceptual art we focused on was social practice art. For those who don’t know what social practice art is, Tribe member Ian explains, “We are focusing on social practice art which is a type of art that is interactive, engages the audience, and conveys a message.”

We looked at examples of social practice art that inspired collaboration and interaction in environments outside the usual gallery or museum walls. Check out this short documentary about a work by Thomas Hirschhorn entitled Gramsci Monument.

Feeling inspired, Tribe tossed around ideas for their own social practice art piece. After some collaborative brainstorming, Tribe decided that they wanted to use their conceptual art piece to convey that “We are more alike than different,” an idea that Ian came up with. They wanted their final message to include:

Matthew: “We all have the same basic needs like love and acceptance.”

Anna: “We all have loved ones.”

Huan: “We are all our own person and have choices to make.”

Ian: “We are human beings with feelings.”

Tom: “We all have high expectations for ourselves.”

Another artist’s work we delved into was Ai Weiwei. His work prompted a mix of reactions. One in particular, entitled Dropping a Han Dynastry Urn, features Weiwei dropping and smashing a 2000-year old urn. The urn was valuable not only financially, but also symbolically and culturally.

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Source: https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/article/ai-weiwei-beginners-guide

Huan:  “Holy moly, I can’t believe he did that in the name of art. If you wanted a reaction that was a way to get a big one.”

Matthew:  “I think it was badass but intense.”

Ian:  “I think it’s a shame to destroy history for the sake of attention.”

While there’s some debate in Tribe over what should and shouldn’t be considered art, everyone agrees that art is about pushing boundaries.

To end the unit, we took a trip to Smithsonian’s Hirsshorn Museum to see Ai Weiwei’s work up close.

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A trip to Washington, D.C. isn’t complete unless you take some tourist-y pictures with the Capitol and the Washington Monument!

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Waiting for the museum to open. Laura S. DeThorne, an SLP from the University of Illinois-Urbana, and her colleague, Henry, joined the outing!

The first part of the Ai Weiwei exhibit showcased a wallpaper installation entitled The Plain Version of the Animal That Looks Like a Llama but Is Really an Alpaca. After a closer inspection of the wallpaper, the Tribe found images of “technology” (Ian), “Twitter bird” (Huan), and “handcuffs” (Ben). Emma and Tom offered up their interpretations of the piece: “It says something about corruption” (Emma) and “The golden age of policing” (Tom).

The exhibit also featured the debut of Trace, an installation of Lego portraits. From the Hirshhorn website: The portraits are of free speech advocates and activists who “have been detained, exiled, or have sought political asylum because of their actions, beliefs, or affiliations.” In Emma’s words, “They were all revolutionaries.”

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Checking out Trace. Navigating past the wall art and the floor installation took a lot of motor control! Huan reflects on the experience: “It took a lot to be aware of everything. The hardest part was not to touch the walls.”

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Reading about the revolutionaries featured in Trace.

When asked how the portraits were a form of social protest, Huan shared: “It is recognizing their sacrifices.” Ian also shared, “Well plastering their infamous images on the floor calls attention to their names.”

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Posing like Ai Weiwei!

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Sharing their final reflections on Ai Weiwei’s work:

Ian: “The openness of the space makes such a difference. I get what Liz was saying about the space being part of the experience.” “It was powerful to see protest in art while browsing through each level of the Hirshhorn. The Ai Weiwei exhibit with the Legos was by far my favorite. It featured images of revolutionaries accused and charged as terrorists in Legos on the floor. It’s so crazy to think of being punished for standing up against evil.”

Tom: “I think it was a good way to call attention to those persecuted for social advocacy.” “It was so intense. I got every piece and I felt the oppression the artist wanted me to. I felt empowered to share my own oppressions.”

Huan: “The trip to the Hirshhorn was powerful I was terribly impressed with the art and how it can communicate the artist’s message. I thought the Ai Weiwei exhibit was incredible. The pictures of individuals who have lost their freedom for standing up for their beliefs was so amazing. I can’t believe that he was able to do this in Legos!

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Until next time, D.C.!

~Janine Caguicla and The Tribe

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Chess Friends Forever

Hi everyone!  My name is Karen Dorula and I’m an occupational therapist at GKTC.  Elizabeth has challenged us all to jump onto the blog.  I’m very excited to be able to share all of the wonderful chess that has been happening here!

I started teaching chess in January 2016 after one of my letterboard clients, William, asked me to teach him “something hard.”  I thought of many different challenging topics, such as the periodic table of elements or the physics of outer space, but when I thought of chess, a quote from one of my favorite movies popped into my head: “Knight to e4.”  (Yes, it’s a Harry Potter quote!)

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I went online and immediately started learning everything there was to know about something called “Algebraic Chess Notation” (ACN).  ACN is a system of letters and numbers that correspond to moves on a chessboard.  Most players use ACN to record their moves in a game so they can review it later.  I thought it would be a perfect way for William to communicate the move he wanted to make and since I’m an occupational therapist, I saw this as a great opportunity for him to practice his motor skills as well.  

ACN Board

There was one slight problem.  I didn’t really know how to play chess.  I had a basic understanding of how the pieces move, but that was it.  I reviewed the fundamentals of chess by myself, and then started teaching it to William.  We practiced simply moving the pieces to a targeted location.  He would spell out the ACN on a letterboard and then I provided him with the least amount of assistance to move the piece.  I continued to teach him more advanced concepts by staying only one step ahead at any given moment.  This became a problem as I realized just how quickly he was learning.  Something that would take me an hour to learn took him only a few minutes.  For example, when capturing, you spell out the symbol for the piece you want to move, the file it’s currently on, an x to indicate the capture, and the square you want it to move to.  So, if you want to capture a piece using your rook, it might look something like, Raxg5.  This took me a longer to learn than I care to admit, but after a few minutes of practice, William spelled, “MAKES SENSE TO ME.”  

William loved learning chess so I dove in head first.  I spent hours a day playing chess on my phone and watching videos online that I later turned into lessons.  After a few weeks, he sat down to play a game with his dad.  His parents noted how regulated he was during the game.  His body was able to stay extremely calm because his brain was so engaged.  As I teach more people to play, regulation is a common result of chess.

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William’s first time playing against his dad.
(From left to right: William, George, Karen)

I have now taught dozens of students how to play.  At first, I didn’t realize just how perfect chess can be for people who spell to communicate (thank you to Elizabeth for seeing the potential!).  Chess is a hobby that can be played throughout a lifetime and you can always learn something new.  Since there are small “mini games” you can play, you can practice even if you only have 10 minutes.  It’s a fun way to get on the letterboards with family members and practice skills.

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Huan and Ian playing a Knight Game, with Huan’s brother and Ian’s dad holding the letterboards.
(From left to right: Thuy, Huan, Ian, Eric)

Chess is also the best equalizer.  It doesn’t matter your age, gender, race, language, socioeconomic status, or diagnosis.  During a discussion about chess as an equalizer, Dustin wrote: “THAT WAS WHY I WANTED TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY WITH THE LETTERBOARD.  PLAYING WITH THE LETTERBOARD IS A WAY TO PLAY WITH YOUR MIND INSTEAD OF YOUR BODY.”

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Chess provides the perfect opportunity to meet new friends.  Here’s a conversation from a chess sessions with Ethan and Dominic:

E: HI, MY NAME IS ETHAN.  KAREN HAS TOLD ME SO MUCH ABOUT YOU.  MAY GO PROFESSIONAL WITH CHESS.  KIDDING.

D: THAT WAS FUNNY.  MY NAME IS DOMINIC.  I JUST STARTED PLAYING THIS WEEK.  I AM REALLY EXCITED TO PLAY.

E: THANK YOU.  MAKES ME HAPPY TO MAKE A NEW FRIEND.

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William, Ethan, and Dominic play against each other in pairs or have “Chess Club,” which they have named One For All, so they can learn and practice drills together.  
(From left to right: Rabun, William, Ethan, Karen, Dominic)

 

I’m grateful to William for challenging me to learn something hard.  Chess didn’t turn out to be very hard for him, but it has become a hobby that he loves.  Chess combines motor, communication, and friendship, which is an OTs dream.  My absolute favorite part of chess is the CFF – Chess Friends Forever – that have been formed! These friendships are what push me to stay up to speed with my students and continue to improve with every session.

I will become more active on the blogs to share information and other activities that we’ve been doing at GKTC.  Until next time!

~Karen

 

 

We have a dream… celebrating MLK weekend in Atlanta

In celebration of Martin Luther King Day, we are reposting this blog from MLK weekend in Atlanta 2 years ago!  Wow!  It is amazing to see how far along these fantastic spellers and self advocates have come since then! The fight for communication rights is stronger than ever! ~Elizabeth

I returned from my second workshop in Atlanta on Martin Luther King Day, January 19, 2015. What a great workshop – 9 funny, smart, hard-working and thoughtful kids, great parents eager to use…

Source: We have a dream… celebrating MLK weekend in Atlanta

Silencing the Silent

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Huan Vuong started advocating for communication and education rights for himself and other nonspeaking individuals as soon as he got on the letterboards. This was his second year presenting at the TASH conference. Due to Huan’s strong advocacy, his school system has recently responded to his requests to meet his communication needs and will provide him with a trained partner so that he can meaningfully participate in general education classes! He will also begin taking classes at a local community college! Huan is the embodiment of determination and self advocacy.  Enjoy his TASH Talk. ~Elizabeth & Huan 

Hello everyone. My name is Huan Vuong and I am happy to talk to you today. Perhaps you notice that I spell instead of speak.

This is the best way for me to communicate. My speech is limited and unreliable. But I can communicate very reliably when I type and spell. Learning to communicate this way changed my life. I finally had a way to express my thoughts. You would think that this new expression would open new educational doors for me. I did too.

The problem is that I have to have a communication partner who knows how to coach my body when I get stuck or too stimmy. I am still autistic even though I can communicate. This means I have motor and sensory issues. My school has been resistant to the idea of my need for support. This has been incredibly frustrating to me.

For the past three years, I have been fighting for my right to be included in general education classes. Completing high school with a real degree seems to be an impossible task. You might think that would be easy, but you would be wrong. This should be a no brainer.  I am a smart guy, I can learn, I want to learn but I need a trained communication partner.

This is why I am here today. TASH is devoted to supporting people with disabilities. Communication is no longer my disability. Motor and sensory will continue to challenge me. But right now the disability I face is access. This is not acceptable to me. I request your help to open access to education, to opportunity and to real inclusion into the neurotypical world by supporting communication rights for all nonspeakers.

Thank you for listening. Now I need to ask you for a favor, I need your voice. I need you to speak up and advocate for me and my friends. Don’t worry we will tell you what to say. Say that we are smart. Say that we want to learn. Say that education is for all. Say that communication is a human right. Thank you. —

The Value of Communication

Last week we promised more presentations by our students at the 2016 TASH Conference in St. Louis.  Ian Nordling is our next self advocate presenting his thoughts on the importance of communication in his TASH Talk.  Ian has been spelling on the letterboards and keyboards for over 2 years and is now beginning to type independently. He is a tenacious advocate for access to communication.  We are sure Ian’s message will resonate you just as they with the audience at TASH. ~Elizabeth

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Ian (center) poses with his cousin Kelsey Aughey (left), one of the fantastic ACTS Professionals in the GKTC Professional Network serving kids at the Hirsch Academy in Atlanta.  Ian and Elizabeth Vosseller (right) have worked together since 2001.

Thank you for being here today. I am Ian Nordling. I am here today to talk about the beauty of communication. I am uniquely qualified to talk about this because I did not have a way to talk until three years ago.

This might sound impossible but it is true. I could not communicate more than a few words. Then I learned to control my arm so I could spell my thoughts on a letterboard. These words took the world for me. I could finally express myself after all of these years. You cannot imagine a greater triumph! The world opened up for me through those words.

I have been pleased to gain entry to the world through the words that had been stuck in my head but are now free. Unless you have been without communication you have no idea how important it is. I really can’t tell you every way that it has changed my life but I can say that it has changed everything.

I now live in Virginia because I was able to tell my parents I wanted to move there so I could be close to GKTC and others like me who spell. I now have phenomenal friends like me who talk with letters. I am finally learning and my intellectual curiosity is satisfied at last. I am incredibly happy today because I can communicate.

*TASH Talks are limited to 8 minutes, so Ian wrote the beginning of his speech (above) prior to the conference and completed the part below live.  

Thank you for being here today. I want to echo Elizabeth, don’t judge me based on my motor. You can clap more for that. I am hungry to learn. I hunger for friends. This hunger can only be satisfied through communication, understanding and acceptance. Time to change beliefs.